apple watch – 6 months after

neither a groundbreaking device or a life changing experience, the apple watch is nonetheless a useful piece of technology that does not cost more than the average mid range traditional watch

Back in the summer of 2015, I was looking for a new dress watch to wear as a daily driver. I had been using the fenix 2 in that way, but its size was problematic when wearing suits and big cuffed shirts. The new watch had to look nice, be resistant to minor abuse, be able to get wet on occasion and have chrono, alarm and timer tools. Most options (the good looking ones anyways) were in the 400-700 range. With the apple watch being in that range too, I decided to give it a chance. 

I purchased the gold and blue 42mm version, which meets all my visual appeal criteria. My approach to find use for it was to deactivate all functions, and only add things as I had the need for them. So far it has not let me down. I played around with the complications until I found the layout I wanted, which gives me all the information I need on any given day.

watch

On to applications. For running, I am using MapMyRun and it works like a charm. Views are easy to change, and the watch seems responsive even with wet fingers, which is something that can not be said for the iPhone. It works well enough to get me to park my Garmin fenix. Based on a few long runs, I believe I can squeeze 18 hours of battery power, which is plenty for even 100km races. Also for running, I use iCountTimer. I like that it has a complication (see screenshot), which is all I need in long timed training sessions.

In the lifestyle category, I use the Starbucks and Overcast apps. I like that the watch becomes a pay medium when I walk into a previously configured Starbucks location, and that I can control my podcast listening experience without having to reach for the phone (very useful when driving as long as you have the glance up all the time). Of course out of the box apps like the remote controls for apple TVs and iPhone cameras are a godsend.

The watch is configured to only receive iMessages from my family, all others stay on the phone until I consciously want to look at them. This is more important than one can imagine, because it eliminates the feel of missing out that pushes all us to look at our phone hundreds of times a day.

The alarm, chrono and timer functions are sufficient for me. All other installed applications I have only used very seldom.

To extend the battery life, I put the watch in reserve mode once I am ready to go to bed, and restart it the morning after once I am getting into the car. Based on this usage pattern, I am able to consistently get 2 days of battery life, with 20% left to spare. If I didn’t charge on the third day, that 20% would last me until shortly after lunch. My unit has taken its good share of abuse, but it hardly shows it.

Overall, I am happy with my purchase. When I am wearing the watch my phone stays in the jacket most of the day. I can check important messages while in a meeting, and discreetly look at my schedule for the rest of my day. I rest assured that if something important happens, I will not miss it.

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